The Volatile Soul

One day I will find the right words,
and they will be perfect.

I like to see people reunited, I like to see people run to each other, I like the kissing and the crying, I like the impatience, the stories that the mouth can’t tell fast enough, the ears that aren’t big enough, the eyes that can’t take in all of the change, I like the hugging, the bringing together, the end of missing someone.

—Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

My soul is from elsewhere, I’m sure of that, and I intend to end up there.

—Rumi  (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

The joke is to get back into the kitchen. The joke is that you’re only good to make food.
The joke is that you can’t be good enough for a man,
because after another man touches you, you are dirty.
The joke is that you will never succeed, because your skirt is always too short. The joke is that you get sent home, because your shoulders are showing. The joke is that you are just a girl, nothing more.

We are born into the role of house mother, of maid, cooker, baker,
a joke.
We are born into the gender of the joke. We are born into dirt,
no matter what we do, we are dirt.
We are sin, we are the reason men sin.
If I am dirty after one man touches me, doesn’t that say more about the dirt on the mans hands than about how dirty I am?

I am not a joke.
I am not a cat call on the street.
I am not a “get back into the kitchen”
I am more than the term “Femanazi”
I am more than Woman.
I am a solar system,
I am expanding, expanding, expanding.
No joke can stop me,

—(Don’t laugh, I’m not a joke) L.S.  (via ls-poetry)

(via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

In ethics class so many years ago
our teacher asked this question every fall:
If there were a fire in a museum,
which would you save,
a Rembrandt painting or an old woman who hadn’t many
years left anyhow? Restless on hard chairs
caring little for pictures or old age
we’d opt one year for life, the next for art
and always half-heartedly. Sometimes
the woman borrowed my grandmother’s face
leaving her usual kitchen to wander
some drafty, half-imagined museum.
One year, feeling clever, I replied
why not let the woman decide herself?
Linda, the teacher would report, eschews
the burdens of responsibility.
This fall in a real museum I stand
before a real Rembrandt, old woman,
or nearly so, myself. The colors
within this frame are darker than autumn,
darker even than winter — the browns of earth,
though earth’s most radiant elements burn
through the canvas. I know now that woman
and painting and season are almost one
and all beyond the saving of children.

 Linda Pastan, “Ethics” (via feellng)

(Source: feellng, via langleav)

babyrad:

There’s this shitty thing that happens when you learn about the reality of racism, sexism and misogyny. You start to hear it from the mouths of your parents, grandparents, friends and siblings and you can’t ignore it anymore but you’ll see how many of them will ignore you when you speak out about it.

(via a-thousand-words)

elation-success:

mydogsnokes:

i miss when i was like 12 and it would be the night before a big field trip or something and i couldnt go to sleep because i was so excited. i miss being so into a book that i would stay up past my bed time reading it. everything seems so bland or something idk. i’m only 19 and everything is so tiring. i miss wanting to be awake

this is the realist shit on this website

(via sofarfetched)

My Captain my captain

O Captain! My Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.
O Captain! My Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.
My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

(via callsignv5)

(via bryarly)

See, women are told from birth that men can’t help themselves. They just can’t resist. Girls and women are supposed to control their appetites, their body odors, their excretions, their facial expressions, their words, their sexual cravings. Men and boys? Can do whatever the fuck they want. Guys who eat as much as they like, burp, sweat, use impolite phrasing, and have sex when and how they please are neither reprimanded nor socially punished; often, in fact, they are glorified. And men who rape? Are usually just “boys being boys.” Here’s the thing: nothing makes rape happen except a rapist. Not being drunk, not wearing “slutty” clothes, not walking home alone, not leaving your drink momentarily out of sight, not being passed out, not agreeing to some sexual acts but not others, not retracting agreement in the moment. Men are capable of resisting these opportunities to rape, because rape is not about sex, it’s not about pleasure — it is about control.